Happy New Year’s Card

I’ve collected a variety of decorative letters from clipartETC.com and arranged them on a jpeg file that you can print and hand color for a quick but fancy Happy New Year sign.
1. Click on the image above to download my prepared jpeg file. Print on a sheet of heavy 8.5" x 11" paper with the landscape setting and all footers removed.
2. Use ultra fine point markers or pencils to fill in the letters and surrounding shapes.

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Tissue Paper Poinsettias

Tearing shapes from tissue paper can create some very organic shapes, and end up looking pretty similar to poinsettia leaves.
1. Give each student some rectangles of red, green and yellow tissue paper (the craft kind, NOT any that says ‘bleeding paper‘). Show them that there is a grain to the paper which makes it easier to tear in one direction than the other. They are to tear petals, leaves and a center for 3 flowers.
2. After all the shapes are torn, give each student a brush and 50/50 water+glue solution. They need to cover a white sheet of paper with the glue, and then arrange their flowers on top of it. When complete, another layer of the glue goes over the entire paper to seal the shapes down to the paper. Let dry for a few hours.
3. With an oil pastel, color around all of the torn shapes, leaving a bit of white edge around the tissue for a more dramatic effect. I like the Portfolio pastels for this because they are so smooth to color with, and make a nice contrast to the bumpy leaves.
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Abstract Shape Drawing

I’m finding that almost anything looks good when drawn on black paper, and colored heavily with oil pastels. This is more of an exercise, but can look like a cool abstract drawing when complete.
1. Give each student a sheet of black construction paper, and ask them to draw one circle, one square and one triangle, with space in between. They may fill the page with more of these shapes, with some of them overlapping. When the page is filled, they need to decide which of the overlapping shapes are in front, and erase all the lines that are inside it. Lastly, they add at least two lines that divide up the background. The lines may “jump” over any objects in front.
2. When the pencil drawing is complete, all the lines are traced with a black pastel.
3. All the enclosed shapes are filled in with pastel, along with all the background areas.
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Pastel Penguin

Penguins are a very popular subject matter. Looking at some large photos before beginning will give students a chance to see colors and detail they may not have noticed before.
1. I first gave the students oval cardboard templates about 5" tall by 3" wide to trace the body on colored construction paper. They then drew the head, wings and feet. Circle eyes and a triangle beak completed the face. A horizon line was added to the background along with sky details.
2. The students then outlined their drawings with a thin black marker and colored in the shapes with oil pastel. Because this image has so much white, it's fun to do on almost any colored paper so that the white can be colored in.

CA Visual Art Standard: Creative Expression, Grade Kindergarten
2.6 Use geometric shapes/forms (circle, triangle, square) in a work of art.
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Nutcracker Painting

One way to have students draw LARGE is to instruct them that their art must touch the top and the bottom of a piece of paper.
1. This project requires 10" x 18" paper, tempera paints, black sharpie marker and a gold opaque metallic marker. Have the students fold the 10" x 18" paper in half, crease, and open.
2. Show them how to draw in pencil a nutcracker that has a hat that touches the top edge, a belt that is on the fold, and shoes that are sitting on the bottom edge. Fill in the nutcracker with details such as boots, shirt button detail and face. The shoulders should nearly touch the sides of the paper.
3. Paint the nutcracker with tempera paints. Lots of red and black make for festive holiday colors.
4. Once the paint is dry, trace over the pencil lines with a black sharpie marker.
5. Use a gold opaque poster marker to fill in detail such as the buttons and cuffs.

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Crayon Resist Snowflakes

If you go to the holiday decoration section at Michael’s, you can find these amazing laser-cut wood snowflake decorations that are cheap (about three for $1) and perfect for making crayon rubbings. These are the same snowflakes I used for the Plaster Paperweight project.
1. I made this picture with a white crayon, but younger students could use bright colors they could see more easily. I placed the snowflake under my paper, and rubbed over it with the side of a large crayon, going back and forth in many directions.
2. Liquid watercolor was painted over all the picture, and dabbed with a paper towel to soak up the paint on the crayon.
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Watercolor Resist Snowflakes

Here's a simple crayon and watercolor painting idea that was inspired by an illustration on a stock art website.
1. As the students will first need to draw with a white crayon on white paper, I've found it helpful to trace 9 large circles very lightly in pencil to use as a guide. As a starting point, I encouraged the students to make an "X" in the middle of each circle, and then a horizontal line through the middle so their flake will have 6 legs. After that, they may add dots or arrows to each, but they must press very hard and draw slowly to leave a lot of crayon on the paper.
2. Once you are certain that there is a snoflake drawn in the middle of each circle, pass out lots of liquid watercolors. When the students fill in each pencil circle with paint, the snowflake will "magically" appear. A simple project with beautiful results, I think.
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Acrylic Dry Brush Landscape Painting

This lesson was to show young students how to layer color when painting with opaque paints, such as acrylic or tempera. Their tendency is to mix and mix and mix, which only creates a muddy palette. If you put some restrictions in place, the outcome is much cleaner and brighter.
1. I had the students paint the bottom third of a horizontal paper white. (This example was done with acrylic, but tempera would work fine too.) Then they chose a main cool color for the sky, as this was to be a winter scene. All the paint needs to be spread thin so that it starts to dry pretty quickly.
2. Next, an accent color was added to the sky as small dots of paint that were brushed with just a few quick strokes. Another accent color was chosen for the ground, and also smoothed with just a few strokes. (This student chose pink for the sky and green for the ground.)
3. After the sky and ground are dry, or even mostly dry, a black fence is painted in with thin horizontal and vertical lines.
4. Snow is added with white paint in the sky, on the fence and on the tree.

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Watercolor Still Life

When it comes to painting, most children need to practice looking at subtle changes in color. The skilled student may already see this, but others may have not been asked to think about it before. In this case, they are challenged to make as many values as they can with just one color and a little water.
1. On a chalk board, draw three simple still life shapes: the coffee cup, the wine glass and a bowl. Ask the students to draw all three in pencil on a 9" x 12" watercolor paper, but note that the items MUST all overlap in some fashion. Add a table edge line somewhere in the middle.
2. Give each student a single dark crayon for them to trace all their pencil lines.
3. Give each student a watercolor set, brush, water, and mixing tray. Tell them they are to use only ONE of the colors in the tray. With this color, they may add water to make different values, for example, very dark red, medium dark red, light red and very light red. As they mix the colors, they should paint in each section of their drawing. The goal is to not have any similar values next to each other.
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Rousseau Tiger Drawing

Henri Rousseau was a French artist that lived in the late 1800s. He tried to paint in the schooled manner of the traditional artists, but it was the innocence and charm of his work that won him the admiration of many avant-garde artists such as Paul Klee.
1. If possible, show a poster of Rousseau's “Surprised! Storm in the Forest” painting to the students. Impress upon them that it was Rousseau's loving attention to detail that made him an exceptional artist. Encourage them to do the same.
2. Give each student a 9" x 12" piece of paper and a 6" cardboard circle template. Have them trace the circle in the center of the paper.
3. Show the students how to draw a simple tiger face, starting with two eyes, two lines going down the center, a upside down triangle nose and two circles drawn to the sides. Whiskers are added, then ears, body and tail. Lastly, triangles may be drawn all around the edges for a tiger look.
4. After the tiger is drawn, ask the students to draw lots of leaves, some that are in the back of the tiger and some are in front. This is important to make the tiger look like he is hiding in the leaves, like in Rousseau's painting.
5. When the drawing is complete, the students should trace all the lines with a black marker and then color everything in with oil pastels.
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Snowman on Skis

I sometimes look at stock illustrations on websites like gettyone.com for inspiration. I found a simple drawing of a snowman on skis that I really liked, and remade with my glue and pastel technique.
1. Drawing lightly on black paper, make three overlapping circles, each getting a bit smaller as they go up.
2. Draw simple stick arms, a face and buttons.
3. Add stick ski poles attached to the hands, and a hat that sits on top of the head. Stripes are nice as they allow for extra color.
4. Draw two skis below the bottom circle, and then a curved horizon line. Trace all lines with a thin line of white glue and let dry for 6 hours or so.
5. When dry, color in all the areas with pastel. I used Art Stix for this picture, which are a kind of new-fangled stick that don't have all the chalky-ness of the chalk pastels. They aren't cheap, but they are clean and sturdy and seem to last forever.
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Close Crop Snowman

Drawing closeup and cropping out what is unnecessary can make just about any artwork more interesting. The tendency is for students to draw small with lots of extra space. If you are trying for dynamic images for special uses like greeting cards, this approach will make a big difference.
1. I started with a 9" x 12" sheet of black paper, and traced a ruler width in pencil around the outside to give the artwork a frame.
2. I used an old CD to trace the bottom circle, purposely placing it so that it would go off the page on one side. The smaller head circle came from centering a smaller cup above the CD circle. I drew in the face, hat, scarf, arms and buttons. A horizon line was added in the background.
3. I took a black pastel, and traced the all the pencil lines, pressing hard so that the line was easily visible. All the shapes were filled in with pastels, and lastly I added some snow on top of the sky.
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Oil Pastel Snowman

This is a little twist (literally) on the usual snowman drawing. It asks students to think about circles can become spheres and have a 3-dimensional shape to them.
1. I started by giving studets a large black paper (12" x 17") and a cardboard circle template (5" diam.) They used the template for drawing the bottom circle, and then had to draw the middle and top circle themselves, in pencil.
2. Next, they were to choose to draw their snowman as turned to either the right or the left, just not head-on as they probably have done in the past.
3. After the pencil drawing was done, the lines were to be traced heavily with a black pastel. Finally, the snowman and background are colored in.
4. I wanted to find an easy way to display the artwork, and found that some leftover white packing boxes were the perfect solution. I taped them shut and spray mounted the art to the smooth side. Voila! A poor man’s self-standing canvas!
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Fine Line Marker Leaves

I find a lot of inspiration at stock art sites like gettyone.com and istock.com. This came from a leaf illustration, which is simpler than it looks if you pencil yourself some guidelines first.
1. I started by drawing the center veins of each leaf, which kind of looked like a long main line with an "X” through it. Sketch lightly with a pencil. Continue drawing these until the paper is full.
2. Still using your pencil, draw the outside curved edge of each leaf as shown in the small corner diagram.
3. Using a fine tip marker such as this Stabilo set, draw parallel lines inside each leaf, taking care to start at the center vein and end at the pencil edge. Continue until the leaves are all filled in.
4. If large spaces are left, parts of a leaf could be added, coming in from the edge of the paper. When all are traced, erase the pencil guidelines around the leaf edges.

CA Visual Arts Standard: Grade Three, Creative Expression
2.1 Explore ideas for art in a personal sketchbook.
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Pumpkin Tissue Paper Painting

Some tissue paper has an amazing ability to bleed when it is mixed with water. Cut-up squares can be used to control the color and make an easy way to paint...without the paint. Word of advice: not all tissue paper bleeds. My impression is that the cheaper variety from Michael's works best, but it is something you need to test before starting.
1. Older students can draw their own pumpkin, younger ones may need a template to trace. A horizon line is added. After the drawing is done in pencil, the lines should be traced with a permanent black marker.
2. My favorite is to get 2 values of orange, green and purple tissue paper. For instance, I cut up dark orange and light orange paper into 2 inch squares, along with dark and light green, and dark and light purple. The students are to wet their drawing with a brush, and then place the tissue paper on the spots they want to color. Working in sections, they should gradually cover their entire paper with colored tissue paper squares.
3. When finished, the tissue paper can be removed to reveal the color that has bled below. Beware, stained fingers seem to be unavoidable, unless gloves are used.
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Paul Klee Portrait

Paul Klee was a Swiss artist from the early 1900's who liked to turn things he saw into simple geometric shapes. His “Head of A Man” is a classic example of his philosophy.
1. In the center of a 9" x 12" sheet of paper, have the students draw a 6" circle, using a cardboard template. Below that the neck and shoulders can be drawn, but only using straight lines and angles.
2. The face may be drawn in pencil, but again only using very simple lines. Trace all with a dark crayon, pressing firmly.
3. Cut up various sheets of tissue paper, in about 3" squares. With a cup of water and a paint brush, the students are to dampen the white paper, and place up pieces of tissue on top in a grid-like format. Once the paper is covered, the tissue may be picked up and thrown away. The student will find that the tissue color has bled to the paper in irregular shapes. It is wise to test tissue paper with water first as some bleed more than others.
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Abstract Winter Trees

A simple illustration I came across in a website inspired this project.
1. Give the students 2 different sizes of narrow triangle cardboard templates, and ask them to draw 3 triangles (trees) across the middle of a sheet of paper.
2. Instruct the students to draw a curvy ground line, and then connect the ground with the trees in a straight line to make the trunks. "V" shapes may be added in the trees to look like branches.
3. Show the students how to divide the background into 3 sections.
4. Ask the students to trace all their pencil lines with a crayon.
5. Give the students watercoler to paint in all the shapes they have created.
6. Use a hole punch to create lots of small white circles. With dots of white glue, add the white circles to the painted pictures.
CA Visual Art Standard: Creative Expression, Grade Five
2.4 Create an expressive abstract composition based on real objects.
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Hundertwasser Landscape

I was inspired by one of Friedensreich Hundertwasser’s paintings to make this abstract landscape.
1. I cut a wavy rectangular shape of green tissue, large enough to cover the bottom 2/3 of the paper. A 50/50 mixture of water and glue was brushed under and over it to attach it to the paper.
2. I cut a bunch of round blue circles, and also glued them to the paper, overlapping a bit at times.
3. After the glue was dry, I used Sharpie markers to draw the tree trunks and lots of organic lines.
4. The sky was filled in with watercolor pencils, and then painted with water.

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Winter Cardinal

I’ve been looking for a nice colorful winter image for a holiday fundraiser, and was inspired by an image I found in a stock photo site.
1. I made cardboard wing templates for students to trace to keep the scale of the bird from starting out too small. The rest of the drawing was done with step-by-step instructions on the board. I described the wing as needing to be tilted a bit, a “shark fin” was added on top, and a belly below. The black face looks a bit like half of a butterfly, and the beak extends directly to the right of it. A tail is added below, along with feet. The branch is behind the feet so it’s lines jump over the feet and tail.
2. After the drawing is done, it needs to be traced with a thin black marker.
3. Lastly, all except the snow is colored in with oil pastels.
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Positive/Negative Drawing

The words “positive” and “negative” can be used to describe both shapes and lines. This is a simple exercise which uses examples of both.
1. Give each student a tall white rectangle, and a black piece of paper that is half the size of the white. The black paper is to sit at the bottom of the white paper. Ask the students to draw three lines to make a smaller black square, the top edge being one side. Have the students cut out the square out in one clean cut (not several pieces).
2. Show how the smaller black square is to flip up, matching corners. Glue down the bottom "negative" shape, and the top "positive" square, leaving a "negative" white space open.
3. Now the students may use a black marker to draw a "positive" vase in the bottom empty square, and a white crayon to draw a "negative" bunch of flowers on the black square above.
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Art Journaling 119

You can make your own art journal for just a few dollars, with just a little binding help from a Staples or Kinko's store.
1. I like to use the cardboard from the backs of drawing pads as it is really sturdy. Cut two 6" x 9" panels, and cut lots of 9" x 12" paper in half to go in between. Take this to a business that will bind this together for you. The coil binding works best as it allows for the pages to open and lay flat.
2. My journal cover was made from some donated iron-on applique...um, things. I'm not sure what you call them. I glued them onto the cardboard, let it dry, and then covered the entire cover with black acrylic paint.
3. When the paint was dry, I rubbed some gold paint (acrylic or tempera) over the surface, just enough to add some shine. To seal the surface, spray with a sealer or cover with Mod Podge.

CA Visual Art Standard: Creative Expression, Grade Three
2.1 Explore ideas for art in a personal sketchbook.
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Arcimboldo “Fruit Face”

Giuseppe Arcimboldo was an Italian artist from the 1500s who spent years working as an official court painter. He developed a style of composing portraits from fruits, vegetables, etc., which was uniquely his own. There's a great book about him called "Fruit Face" which is what I used to introduce this lesson.
1. Find lots of large, colorful images of all kinds of fruits and vegetables from either magazines or stock photos online. I found that www.iStockPhoto.com has lots to choose from and are not too expensive.
2. Make color prints or color copies of all the images and distribute to the students, along with a scissors, glue stick and black construction paper. Show them how they can "build" a face by layering smaller, feature-like pieces on top of larger shapes. Careful cutting (removing all the background) will help make their face look nice and neat.
3. Lastly, the students will glue down all the shapes, starting with the background. Encourage lots of detail with clothes, accessories, etc.
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Art Journaling 118

I think my biggest goal for my upcoming art journal class is to have kids embrace the loose, accidental art that can happen when you let yourself just create. Fourth and 5th graders especially tend to get more judgmental about their abilities, so I hope this un-fussy journal page will let them have some fun.
1. I started by tearing small leaves from tissue paper, and planned out three flowers on each page. Using 50/50 glue and water, I wet the journal pages and arranged the tissue flowers on top. Let dry completely.
2. Drawing with one continuous line, I started at the bottom with a Sharpie marker, traced up and around each petal 2 times, added little loops in the center of the flower, and then drew back down to the beginning point. Small leaves may be added.
3. Using either watercolor or watercolor pencils, paint the background, intentionally leaving white space around each flower and leaf. In fact, the paint should not touch the marker at any point. The extra white adds some extra punch to this colorful layout.

CA Visual Art Standards: Grade Five
2.4 Create an expressive abstract composition based on real objects.
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Mache Pumpkin from Plastic Bags

This pumpkin is made from about 40 plastic grocery bags, some Saran wrap, 3 rubber bands, newspaper, paper towel and mache, topped off with a beautiful new orange glitter paint I found at Jo-Ann Fabrics. I'm so excited to have found this beautiful way to recycle plastic grocery bags.

Plastic Bag Pumpkin Tutorial
1. Collect about 40 plastic bags and loosely stuff them inside each other, one at a time. Compress lightly and tie bag shut with a slipknot at the top.


2. To smooth the surface, wrap the outside of the bag with a few long pieces of Saran Wrap. Overlap as necessary to keep edges lying flat. Take a rubberband (I used a 3" dia.) and slip around the center of the ball. Repeat with 2 more rubberbands, adjusting them evenly.



Adjust your rubberbands on top to be as close to the “stem” as possible, and the bottom to make a nicely centered crisscross as shown above.

3. Cover the pumpkin with one layer of paper mache. Be sure to run your finders through the creases often so that they stay prominent and don’t get smoothed over. For my favorite mache recipe, click here. Let dry overnight. Repeat with another layer of newspaper and let dry.

4. This step really helps to smooth out the bumps and gives you a nice white background to paint on. Cover the pumpkin with one layer of mache and paper towels.

5. I painted my pumpkin with two shades of Americana® orange acrylic paint. First a darker Cadmium Orange, then highlights of Jack-O-Lantern Orange, and finally Holly Green for the stem. After the paint dried, I added a layer of “Craft Twinkles Orange” from DecoArt®. It’s a kind of gel-looking paint that not only adds glitter, but a nice shine as well.

I’m going to experiment next with making more of these in different sizes. I think for elementary age students though, this size or larger would be best. This pumpkin measures about 8" in diameter.
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Art Journaling 117

This is another drawing inspired by the Austrian abstract artist, Friedensreich Hundertwasser. His philosophy about nature is very reflective in his artwork, so I used his quote and love of wavy lines to jump start this journal page.
1. I started by drawing a wavy horizontal line, and then five random circles for the flower centers above it. All the centers had a stem drawn down, then lots of concentric circles around them.
2. When I was happy with the size of the flowers, I drew lots of wavy horizontal lines that imitated the horizon line, and jumped around each flower.
3. After the sky was complete, I added block letters below spelling out one of my favorite quotes from Hundertwasser. With the drawing done, I traced all the lines with a thin black marker.
4. Using colored pencils, I filled in the drawing, using some more coloring ideas from Hundertwasser. The background I colored one color with medium pressure, and then came back over the black lines and pressed harder to shade. The ground and stems and letters were colored with matching colors too keep things readable. But with the flower circles, I let myself try all different kinds of combinations to see what I liked best. I think having some rules like this will keep teachers from getting a lot of half-done pages which have a tendency, in my experience, to not get completed.
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Art Journaling 116

Aluminum foil and Sharpies are at work here, in addition to some extra texture rubbing.
1. This idea comes from “The Usborne Book of Art Projects” book, one of my favorite. I started by taking a plastic net that onions come in, and stretching it over a square of cardboard. With a piece of heavy-duty aluminum foil placed on top, I lightly drew a rainbow trout fish with a pencil. I had help by looking at pictures on the internet, but students could look at colored pictures. The more details the students add, the more colorful their fish will look.
2. When the drawing was complete, I colored in all the rainbow colors of the fish (rubbing to get lots of bumps) and then traced the fish with a black marker. Dots may be added at the end. When complete, all the fish are cut out.
3. I painted the background of two journal pages with watercolor, leaving some sky space on the top. When the paint was dry, I arranged the fish and glued them down.
4. Lastly, I used a silver Sharpie to write a bit about these interesting fish, and added some details to the water too. This process might work well for any report that involves shiny, colorful animals.
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Art Journaling 115

Some of the best art journal pages I’ve seen just seem to just have a sense of freedom to them. I think that’s going to be my number one goal when I take this project to the classroom in a couple of weeks. The paper can be spotty and messy, headlines can go at the bottom instead of the top, and writing can go sideways and even upside down. No worries, just paint and draw and write and have fun!
1. I put a teabag in a few tablespoons of hot water to make some really strong tea. Note: Test the different teas first, a cinnamon type worked much better than Lipton. Using a brush or the wet teabag, smear the paper with tea, leaving some blotches and white spots. Let dry.
2. There are many “how to draw a cat” sites on the internet, but I liked http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/Sparkythespark/howtodraw.jpg because it seemed appropriate for elementary age students. I drew the cat across the pages with a pencil, and then traced with a brown Gelly Roll pen.
3. My title seemed to fit the best on the bottom right. I made block letters and then shaded in the edges.
4. Lastly, I wrote about my cats in the area remaining, and decided it didn’t have to be horizontal. I made my writing go up and down and follow the shape of the tail. This was a fun page to do and I really liked how the tea spots dried and all the natural colors seem to work together.
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First Flower Painting

This project makes for a great introduction to painting. And if you give students just the primary colors or red, yellow and blue, they can mix their own green.

1. Fold a tabloid or larger sheet of paper in half. Paint a blue vase in the center of the bottom half.


2. Paint 5 – 6 yellow dots in the top half of the paper.

3.  Paint red circle leaves around each flower.

4.  Use the yellow and blue paint to mix green and connect each flower to the vase. Add leaves where there is space.
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Torn Duck Collage

I adore torn edges. They have a way of making shapes that would never happen if you started cutting away with a pair of scissors.

1. Find two magazine pages with similar shades of yellow, and two with similar shades of orange.

2. Tear small shapes from both sheets of yellow and glue to make up the main body.

3. Add yellow torn shapes to create legs, tail and head.

4. Tear dark orange shapes for the feet, and light orange for the beak. Draw an eye with a black marker.





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Me & My Goals Self Portrait

This was inspired by a New Jersey middle school posting you can see HERE. Drawing just the top face allows a focus on the eyes, and the beginning of a school year is a good time to declare goals.

1. You can download my template with paper lines already on it HERE. Printing on cardstock will be the easiest to work with.


2. Start by drawing the eyes in pencil, just above the paper. Follow the rule that two eyes should always be one eye-width apart.


3. Draw the top of the head, almost touching the top of the paper.


4. Draw the rest of the face and fingers on the side. Student’s names go at the top and they are to finish the sentence “My goals for the 2012-2013 school year are...". All lines are traced with a thin marker. The art is colored in with pencil crayons.




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Art Journaling 114

I used two laws of perspective to help give this spread some depth. One is that with distance, similar shapes appear to get smaller, and two is that colors in general get lighter.
1. I started by drawing a horizon line about 2/3 of the way down the page. I drew the road that narrowed with distance, added the trees that got smaller, and the border around the edge.
2. With the lettering, I'm trying to experiment with staggered placement to both loosen up the look and hopefully the students. This journal should be one place where they don't have to worry about keeping things in straight lines. When I was happy with the pencil writing, I traced everything with a black Sharpie, going over the headline letters twice to make them darker.
3. Lastly, I colored in the pages with my favorite Prismacolor colored pencils. I used the lightest shade of green for the distance fields, and a darker for the area that is up close. I imagine two shades of blue could be used for the sky too.
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Art Journaling 113

I started with one of my favorite poems, “The Wise Owl” for this 2-page spread layout.
1. I really love the look of white on dark journal pages I have been coming across, so I splurged on a white DecoColor marker from Aaron Brothers for $3.50. To prepare the pages, I painted them with a dark blue watercolor and let dry.
2. My owl was drawn on the right page copying a magazine image, but I will probably find something simpler when I do this with a class. The point is to have a large bird drawing, with as many feathers and spots and line details as possible.
3. On the left side, I wrote my poem “The Wise Owl”
The wise old owl
sat in an oak.
The more he saw
the less he spoke.
The less he spoke
the more he heard.
Why can’t we be like
that wise old bird?
4. Some stars and dots were added around the pages, with a little yellow oil pastel inside the large stars.
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Art Journaling 112

This is another 2-page art journal spread, this time on the topic of dreaming.
1. I plan to give the students a rectangle to trace, one approximately the size of the shown quilt. They are to tilt it, make it go off the paper, and trace.
2. The head is drawn, along with a pillow and headboard. The quilt may be divided up into smaller squares. A quick heading and paragraph about dreaming are added in the extra space.
3. All lines are traced with a black marker. I filled in all the spaces on the quilt with color and pattern.
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