Hundertwasser Landscape

I was inspired by one of Friedensreich Hundertwasser’s paintings to make this abstract landscape.
1. I cut a wavy rectangular shape of green tissue, large enough to cover the bottom 2/3 of the paper. A 50/50 mixture of water and glue was brushed under and over it to attach it to the paper.
2. I cut a bunch of round blue circles, and also glued them to the paper, overlapping a bit at times.
3. After the glue was dry, I used Sharpie markers to draw the tree trunks and lots of organic lines.
4. The sky was filled in with watercolor pencils, and then painted with water.

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Winter Cardinal

I’ve been looking for a nice colorful winter image for a holiday fundraiser, and was inspired by an image I found in a stock photo site.
1. I made cardboard wing templates for students to trace to keep the scale of the bird from starting out too small. The rest of the drawing was done with step-by-step instructions on the board. I described the wing as needing to be tilted a bit, a “shark fin” was added on top, and a belly below. The black face looks a bit like half of a butterfly, and the beak extends directly to the right of it. A tail is added below, along with feet. The branch is behind the feet so it’s lines jump over the feet and tail.
2. After the drawing is done, it needs to be traced with a thin black marker.
3. Lastly, all except the snow is colored in with oil pastels.
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Positive/Negative Drawing

The words “positive” and “negative” can be used to describe both shapes and lines. This is a simple exercise which uses examples of both.
1. Give each student a tall white rectangle, and a black piece of paper that is half the size of the white. The black paper is to sit at the bottom of the white paper. Ask the students to draw three lines to make a smaller black square, the top edge being one side. Have the students cut out the square out in one clean cut (not several pieces).
2. Show how the smaller black square is to flip up, matching corners. Glue down the bottom "negative" shape, and the top "positive" square, leaving a "negative" white space open.
3. Now the students may use a black marker to draw a "positive" vase in the bottom empty square, and a white crayon to draw a "negative" bunch of flowers on the black square above.
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Art Journaling 119

You can make your own art journal for just a few dollars, with just a little binding help from a Staples or Kinko's store.
1. I like to use the cardboard from the backs of drawing pads as it is really sturdy. Cut two 6" x 9" panels, and cut lots of 9" x 12" paper in half to go in between. Take this to a business that will bind this together for you. The coil binding works best as it allows for the pages to open and lay flat.
2. My journal cover was made from some donated iron-on applique...um, things. I'm not sure what you call them. I glued them onto the cardboard, let it dry, and then covered the entire cover with black acrylic paint.
3. When the paint was dry, I rubbed some gold paint (acrylic or tempera) over the surface, just enough to add some shine. To seal the surface, spray with a sealer or cover with Mod Podge.

CA Visual Art Standard: Creative Expression, Grade Three
2.1 Explore ideas for art in a personal sketchbook.
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Arcimboldo “Fruit Face”

Giuseppe Arcimboldo was an Italian artist from the 1500s who spent years working as an official court painter. He developed a style of composing portraits from fruits, vegetables, etc., which was uniquely his own. There's a great book about him called "Fruit Face" which is what I used to introduce this lesson.
1. Find lots of large, colorful images of all kinds of fruits and vegetables from either magazines or stock photos online. I found that www.iStockPhoto.com has lots to choose from and are not too expensive.
2. Make color prints or color copies of all the images and distribute to the students, along with a scissors, glue stick and black construction paper. Show them how they can "build" a face by layering smaller, feature-like pieces on top of larger shapes. Careful cutting (removing all the background) will help make their face look nice and neat.
3. Lastly, the students will glue down all the shapes, starting with the background. Encourage lots of detail with clothes, accessories, etc.
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Art Journaling 118

I think my biggest goal for my upcoming art journal class is to have kids embrace the loose, accidental art that can happen when you let yourself just create. Fourth and 5th graders especially tend to get more judgmental about their abilities, so I hope this un-fussy journal page will let them have some fun.
1. I started by tearing small leaves from tissue paper, and planned out three flowers on each page. Using 50/50 glue and water, I wet the journal pages and arranged the tissue flowers on top. Let dry completely.
2. Drawing with one continuous line, I started at the bottom with a Sharpie marker, traced up and around each petal 2 times, added little loops in the center of the flower, and then drew back down to the beginning point. Small leaves may be added.
3. Using either watercolor or watercolor pencils, paint the background, intentionally leaving white space around each flower and leaf. In fact, the paint should not touch the marker at any point. The extra white adds some extra punch to this colorful layout.

CA Visual Art Standards: Grade Five
2.4 Create an expressive abstract composition based on real objects.
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