Art Journaling 106

I’m on a quest to find quick, inexpensive ways to layer art. I’ve always admired those adult journals that just seemed stuffed with creativity. This watercolor page was fun, but I think it would look even better with children’s handwriting on it.
1. I started with warm-colored watercolor paints and filled a journal page, overlapping the swatches until the page was full.
2. I placed some of those little reinforcement circles on the paper, colored over with crayon, and then peeled them off. Note: The circles stuck a little too well and I had to use a pin to pry them off, even after using one several times.
3. My writing inspiration came from the famous opener “Once upon a time”. I’m thinking that you could ask the students to write that across the top of the page. They could imagine the beginning of some story, draw an image to go with it, and write the opening sentences somewhere. If the kids are just asked to begin a story, and not necessarily worry about an ending, they might have more fun with the creative possibilities.
You have read this article 4th grade / 5th grade / journal with the title July 2009. You can bookmark this page URL http://anitalaydonmillersmiddlegradeblog.blogspot.com/2009/07/art-journaling-106.html. Thanks!

Finish the Picture Animal

If you want to catch the attention of wiggly boys or tomboy girls, try using their favorite animals as a theme to work on with a “finish the picture” project.
1. You’ll need zoo magazines or something that has lots of good animals pictures. The students are to find an animal they like, cut a square around the head, and then glue it down to a large piece of white paper.
2. The students draw in pencil what they believe the rest of the animal looks like. Taking note of the colors and textures in the photo, they are to complete the picture with colored pencils.
This picture was drawn by my son in 1st grade.

CA Visual Art Standard: Grade One
1.1 Describe and replicate repeated patterns in nature, in the environment, and in works of art.
You have read this article 1st grade / 2nd grade / 3rd grade / 4th grade / pencil crayon with the title July 2009. You can bookmark this page URL http://anitalaydonmillersmiddlegradeblog.blogspot.com/2009/07/finish-picture-animal.html. Thanks!

Herd of Animals

Overlapping shapes create depth in a picture, and creating a herd of animals is a fun way to teach that principal.
1. I found this idea over at artsonia.com and have made a quick template of 3 animals you can download here. You will need to trace them onto a heavier paper – such as card stock or even posterboard and cut them out before class.
2. Ask the students to choose one animal template, and trace it 5 or 6 times in pencil. Some may overlap and some may go off their paper. When complete, they are to decide which animals are in front and erase all the extra lines that are inside it. This is repeated until there are no animals that have a “see-through” look to them.
3. All the pencil lines are traced with a thin black marker, and the herd is colored in with pastels, crayons or pencil crayons.

CA Visual Art Standard: Creative Expression, Grade Two
2.3 Depict the illusion of depth (space) in a work of art, using overlapping shapes, relative size, and placement within the picture.
You have read this article 2nd grade / 3rd grade / CA Art Standard with the title July 2009. You can bookmark this page URL http://anitalaydonmillersmiddlegradeblog.blogspot.com/2009/07/herd-of-animals.html. Thanks!

Bobby Pin Fashion Face

I saw this bobby pin idea used on a hairstylist’s business card. It’s too good not to use for a fashion illustration exercise.
1. You will need to pre-cut with an x-acto knife, about a 1.25" curved slots on card stock paper for each student.
2. I found it best to make the drawing first. With a pencil, continue the curve shape to make the head, and then fill in the face. Trace all with a thin black marker and color with colored pencils. A body could be added if time and space permits. If you do, remember that fashion illustration is all about making extra long and slender shapes
so encourage exaggerated bodies.
3. When the coloring is done, about 14 hair pins are slid into the slotted curve and arranged as desired.

CA Visual Art Standard: Creative Expression, Grade One
2.7 Use visual and actual texture in original works of art.
You have read this article 1st grade / 2nd grade / 3rd grade / CA Art Standard with the title July 2009. You can bookmark this page URL http://anitalaydonmillersmiddlegradeblog.blogspot.com/2009/07/bobby-pin-fashion-face.html. Thanks!